Designer’s Challenge: Finished!

Presenting my finished top for the Designer’s Challenge Super Challenge!

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It fulfills all three of the requirements – it is clearly a top, it has origami folds at the neck, and I talked about the stripes in the last post.

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The origami neck detail is probably my favorite part. It is formed out of two long strips of garter stitch that are folded together. They spiral around each other when sewn to the top, and create a really interesting neckline.

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I’m excitedly working on grading this pattern so that it will fit all sizes of knitters instead of just me. At some point, I hope to release it as my first ever top/sweater pattern! Stay tuned for updates.

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Designer’s Challenge 1: Stripes

This is part one of a four part post where I’m planning on blogging about my inspiration for the June/July super challenge at the Designer’s Challenge group on Ravelry. If you’re interested in participating, there’s still plenty of time to join in! There are three criteria that must be met in order for the design to count. It must be a top, have stripes, and be somehow related to the theme “origami”.

My focus for this post is going to be on the stripes in my design. In my top, garter stitch stripes in the CC (Lipstick Lava) contrast with stockinette stitch stripes in the MC (Crying Dove).

I wanted to do something more than basic, even stripes. To add some interest, I decided to use the Fibonacci sequence. This sequence goes 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, etc. The next number in the sequence is found by adding the previous two numbers together (1+1=2, 1+2=3, 2+3=5, 3+5=8, 5+8=13, etc.). In my knitting, I interpreted this by starting off with 8 garter ridges, then 8 rounds of stockinette stitch, then 5 garter ridges, then 5 rounds stockinette stitch, etc. This produces an interesting stripe that seems to naturally fade away as it reaches the waist shaping, which was just the effect I was looking for.

Right now I’m up to the bust line and preparing to shape the armholes and the neckline. In future posts, I will explain my inspiration for the “top” and the “origami” parts of the challenge as well.